Vitamin D: 10 Ways to Get Your Daily Dose

Vitamin D: 10 Ways to Get Your Daily Dose

Vitamin D: 10 Ways to Get Your Daily Dose Getting enough vitamin D is essential to your health. It acts as a hormone and affects more than just your skin. A healthy amount of vitamin D circulating in your body ensures your bones are strong, teeth are strong and healthy, muscles function properly, intestinal tract works well and immune system fights infection effectively. Vitamin D is also known as the sunshine vitamin or the lutein-vitamin D3 couple because it’s available in large amounts from sunlight, which also helps you absorb it better. But getting enough of this sunshine vitamin isn’t always easy. Even though many people have easy access to natural sunlight now thanks to our modern lifestyles, we can still become deficient in this important micronutrient if we don’t get enough exposure or feed from other sources such as dietary supplements.

What is vitamin D?

Vitamin D is actually a group of proteins produced in your skin when sunlight hits your skin cells. However, this “sunshine” source only converts a small percent of our skin cells into vitamin D3. The majority of vitamin D is found in fatty foods like fish, eggs, fatty fish such as salmon, and milk. The body actually uses sunlight to produce vitamin D, but the amount of sun you need to make enough varies by region, season, skin type and age. What does vitamin D do? Vitamin D is known as the “happy hormone” because it’s responsible for maintaining healthy bones, teeth and muscles. It helps your body absorb calcium from your digestive tract, keeping your teeth strong and your muscles and heart healthy. Vitamin D can also help your immune system fight off infections so you aren’t as likely to fall sick. How much vitamin D do we need?

Vitamin D is now considered a “conditional vitamin” because not everyone needs the same amount. Your body needs a certain amount of vitamin D to work properly depending on your specific genetics, diet and sun exposure. The amount you need depends on your current status and health, but the American Heart Association recommends a minimum daily intake of 10 micrograms per day for adults. People who are dark-skinned or have darker skin tones have lower levels of vitamin D in their bodies because it tends to be more abundant in the sun-exposed skin of light-skinned individuals. Vitamin D levels are highest when you are outside in the sun for at least 10 minutes, paying attention to the right parts of your body.

Food sources of vitamin D Vitamin D is found in a wide variety of foods but is only extracted when exposed to sunlight. To get the amount the body needs, look for labels that indicate vitamin D levels. – Vitamin D-fortified milk – Vitamin D is naturally found in cow’s milk, but it’s often added as an extra vitamin to other types of milk. You get between 30 and 60 percent of the daily recommended intake of vitamin D from one cup of milk. – Salmon – Although another name for this fish is “sea salmon,” it’s caught in fresh water and can be eaten in a variety of ways like tacos and burritos. Salmon is one of the best sources for vitamin D, containing about 40 percent of the daily recommended intake for the average person. – Cod liver oil – This vitamin D-rich oil is extracted from cod liver, a fatty fish that is high in omega-3 fatty acids.

Vitamin D is found in cod liver oil but is not as potent as salmon for daily supplementation. – Eggs – One hard-boiled egg contains about one-third of the daily recommended intake of vitamin D. – Mushrooms – Vitamin D is found naturally in mushrooms and can be found in a variety of types such as portobello. Mushrooms are a good source of dietary fibre, iron and manganese while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Beef – Beef is another source of iron, protein and vitamin D. However, the iron content varies depending on the animal and the amount of vitamin D in the feed used to grow the beef cattle. – Sardines – These small fish are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and protein while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. –

Tuna – Tuna is a good source of protein while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Eggs – One hard-boiled egg contains about one-third of the daily recommended intake of vitamin D. – Salmon – Although another name for this fish is “sea salmon,” it’s caught in fresh water and can be eaten in a variety of ways like tacos and burritos. Salmon is one of the best sources for vitamin D, containing about 40 percent of the daily recommended intake for the average person. – Cod liver oil – This vitamin D-rich oil is extracted from cod liver, a fatty fish that is high in omega-3 fatty acids. Vitamin D is found in cod liver oil but is not as potent as salmon for daily supplementation. – Sardines – These small fish are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and protein while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Tuna – Tuna is a good source of protein while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Eggs – One hard-boiled egg contains about one-third of the daily recommended intake of vitamin D. – Mushrooms – Vitamin D is found naturally in mushrooms and can be found in a variety of types such as portobello. Mushrooms are a good source of dietary fibre, iron and manganese while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Beef – Beef is another source of iron, protein and vitamin D.

However, the iron content varies depending on the animal and the amount of vitamin D in the feed used to grow the beef cattle. – Sardines – These small fish are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and protein while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Tuna – Tuna is a good source of protein while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Eggs – One hard-boiled egg contains about one-third of the daily recommended intake of vitamin D. – Mushrooms – Vitamin D is found naturally in mushrooms and can be found in a variety of types such as portobello. Mushrooms are a good source of dietary fibre, iron and manganese while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D.

Food sources of vitamin D

– Cod liver oil – Vitamin D is found in cod liver oil but is not as potent as salmon for daily supplementation. – Salmon – Although another name for this fish is “sea salmon,” it’s caught in fresh water and can be eaten in a variety of ways like tacos and burritos. Salmon is one of the best sources for vitamin D, containing about 40 percent of the daily recommended intake for the average person. – Sardines – These small fish are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and protein while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Tuna – Tuna is a good source of protein while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Eggs – One hard-boiled egg contains about one-third of the daily recommended intake of vitamin D. – Mushrooms – Vitamin D is found naturally in mushrooms and can be found in a variety of types such as portobello. Mushrooms are a good source of dietary fibre, iron and manganese while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Beef – Beef is another source of iron, protein and vitamin D. However, the iron content varies depending on the animal and the amount of vitamin D in the feed used to grow the beef cattle. – Sardines – These small fish are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and protein while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Tuna – Tuna is a good source of protein while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D. – Eggs – One hard-boiled egg contains about one-third of the daily recommended intake of vitamin D. – Mushrooms – Vitamin D is found naturally in mushrooms and can be found in a variety of types such as portobello. Mushrooms are a good source of dietary fibre, iron and manganese while also providing significant amounts of vitamin D.

Synthetic forms of vitamin D for supplementation

Vitamin D is actually found naturally in several foods, but it’s only produced when your skin is exposed to sunlight. This makes it difficult to get